Category: ebooks



You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)You’re Never Weird on the Internet by Felicia Day

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I have always admired Felicia Day. It was great to see a smart female actress playing smart female characters on the shows I’ve seen her on.

This book gave me insight to the person and her history. It was fun to know that we shared a similar history. No, I’m old enough to be her mother. But my children shared her history and I through them. We learned the computer from way back with CompuServe, Prodigy (where I met my husband) and various video games and bulletin boards. Her ultimate game was WoW whereas my kids got into EQ. It was fun reading about how it was physically meeting the friends she made online. That experience the kids and I shared. But it was fun to watch the computer evolving with the generation who came of age at the same time.

My children were homeschooled, too. It was interesting to see her thoughts on it. I find that we who were schooled who wasted so many years with more time dedicated to kids with bad behaviors or teachers who bored us to sleep and were still quite socially shy and experienced depression tried to save our children of that. Instead, they blame their very anxiety on not having to school. They don’t realize the opportunity they had without all the wasted time. Felicia became a professional violinist. And all these skills she acquired that makes her unique are a direct result from not being squeezed into a mold that schools force children into.

Anyway, I loved being able to listen to Felicia read her own story. It gave, even more, credence to autobiography. I knew I wanted to listen to her read it. But I found that there was no Text-to-Speech. That made me sad because had I not been able to afford the Audible version to whispersynch I would have had no way to enjoy this book. Still, it was delightful to listen to her voice. I wish her the very best in life. She deserves it!

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I Am Nujood, Age 10 and DivorcedI Am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced by Nujood Ali

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Thank you, Yvensong, for suggesting this read.

I was able to pick up the Overdrive and Kindle versions from the e-library. I loved the narrator: Meera Simhan. She did a great job reading for what was supposed to be a 10-year-old.

This is a great book to open the discussion of how girls and women are treated worldwide. When we look at what this poor girl and other like her have gone through, we, here in America, think that could never happen. But we have not gone far enough here. There is so much more work to show that equality is what is needed for a better world for everyone.

Nujood Ali has written a book that is short and sweet. I do believe that it could be read by all ages, and should be read by males so they can move to better understanding.

What I loved about reading along on the Kindle as the Overdrive narrator read to me were the foreign words that were hyperlinked to definitions. Even so, there weren’t so many that one couldn’t guess by context as to what they meant. I suggest everyone read this treasure.

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Elphie Goes Trick or Treating (Elphie Books Book 3)Elphie Goes Trick or Treating by Hagit R. Oron

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I received this book free of charge from the author. Thank you!

Do you have a child that is afraid of masks or other aspects of Halloween? I remember when my first was afraid of masks. The one that frightened him was made of rubber. I turned it inside out and said it was made of rubber. Then I picked up other things around the house made of the same substance. I don’t think it helped at all. This little story might have helped.

I loved how the parent let the little guy go out without his mask just so he could still have fun wth his friend. When the child got used to how everyone responds to the fun of the evening he decides for himself that wearing a mask is okay. It is always better to let the child come to his or her own healthy conclusions than forcing an issue. Wise messages are here.

I think that the only problem I had with the book was that it was written in first-person. For some reason that was jarring. I tried to imagine reading this story to a child reading the “I” statements would seem to take a child out of the story. If it is meant to be an early reader that might work. But books like this I would want to read aloud to my children long before they learned to read so we could talk about the subject matter.

Still, I do think this is a cute book. I love the little elephant, Elphie.

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Life After CoffeeLife After Coffee by Virginia Franken

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I want to thank NetGalley for letting me read this book. I liked the title and the premise of the story.

If you are under 45 this may be the book for you. Being a child of the 60s and the era of bra-burning, I was excited to see a book about a reversal of roles. Stay-at-home dad, mom travels for a high paying job. But I didn’t much like the characters. The dad seems the abandon the parenting job when the wife needs him to step up. She is left floundering with a couple young children after losing her job. She makes a lot of bad choices while her husband won’t see that his ‘back-up-plan’ won’t keep the family feed.

Look, I am glad we are in an era where this kind of story can be told and most of the reviewers LOVE it. The feminist in me is SO happy. But the humanist in me is still not satisfied with most of this story. I do love that the author researched about the finding and securing good coffee for the Starbuck’s obsessed. But for me, a tea-drinker, the story ended where I wanted it to start.

Still, I am giving this four stars for being modern and different. But YOU may just LOVE it.

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Where We FallWhere We Fall by Rochelle B. Weinstein

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This was another winner that I got for free from NetGalley.com.

Picking up this book was therapy. I felt I could relate with the main character, Abby, who seems beset with depression and anxiety. These are disabilities that pulled me from the workforce and 14 years ago. I’ve been through the medication, and therapy routes. I finally gave up. For the same reasons that Abby did. But watching her try to find answers gave me hope that if I try I might find my own answers.

Mental illness is a tough thing to deal with. To be raised by someone with it and knowing how you have to walk around it, how your childhood is merely survival, how that is the one thing you have in common with the family members and the life with those issues is ALWAYS there. When you wonder if this is the last day for you to live or would your mother actually blow up the house with everyone in it this day. When you are raised like that, it is easy to understand Abby’s daughter, Juliana, and what she is growing up around.

And the husband comes off like a saint. This particular husband, Coach Ryan found and adjusted to this life with a life that was fulfilling. Not often the outcome for spouses of the mentally ill. I don’t think my father ever found a life until my mother was gone. He had work and TV and sleep.

So I know what I am talking about when I say that this book was well done, literally, and psychologically. Either the author was raised with or has lived with mental illness or she did some fantastic research. Her story did not come across as judgemental or preachy. She made the characters very human. I loved the way she told the story through this family’s individual points of view and once established as a part of the history, Abby’s best friend, Lauren’s viewpoint.

While the drama centers around the family and friend of Abby, maybe the character that is most seen and given understanding is depression and its friend, anxiety. Abby’s counselors come across as human and yet wise, asking the right questions and words to cling to as you find yourself sinking. Oops, for Abby, when she would find herself going astray of her healthy choices.

As you can tell, I took a lot of this wisdom to heart. I plan to reread this later, maybe pick up the Audible version as I read a review that praised it highly. I think I need to practice some of the ways Abby learns to deal with her issues. I have to admit that I stuff things down like she did. Most people wouldn’t know I was depressed or anxious as I can hide it from myself and everyone else. But these issues have ways to come to life on their own. I think that is where my Fibromyalgia comes from, stuffing it all down deep into my bones. Now I need to look at what is needing my attention and I will need help dealing with what comes up.

Thank you, Rochelle B. Weinstein, for writing such an insightful book and sharing it with the world.

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Cast in Angelfire (The Mage Craft Series, #1)Cast in Angelfire by S.M. Reine

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I was given this book by the author for an honest review.

I always love it when I can go into the worlds Ms. Reine has built. And I feel exhilarated when I come back to the real world safe and sound. Yes, there will be more to the story but it didn’t leave you on a cliffhanger.

BUT, there is something I wish Sara would do: Please, at the end of the book or the beginning or somewhere on the internet, a cast of characters. Somehow I was under the impression that Marion was Elise’s mother. I did remember she was someone important to Elise. And somehow I had forgotten what had happened to Seth in previous books. Yes, I can understand keeping the history vague due to the fact of Marion’s amnesia but somewhere to be able to look it all up would be great for those of us who have read ALL the books so far and have our own memory problems.

Marion was a growing character in this book and one falls in love with Dr. Luke. And you do feel the connection. You feel that there may be history yet because of the memory lapse on Marion’s side Dr. Luke seems hesitant to do certain things. This ebb and flow of curiosity keeps one moving through the book to find out how and what this connection is, was or is going to be.

As usual, I wish everyone could read all of Ms. Reine’s books starting with Seasons of the Moon. Hard to believe all the characters, beings, and worlds that this prolific writer has brought into being from that young girl, Riley, and to see her make an appearance in this book made it all the better. These worlds and people are as real to me now as they have to be to Sara Reine. Can’t wait for the next one!

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The Father HuntThe Father Hunt by Becca J. Campbell

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Disclosure: I was given this ARC by the author for an honest review.

This is the latest in the Flawed series. The difference here, is there are no gifts that I can see no talents, no extra sensory flaws. Just a young teen trying to figure out who his father is.

As a character development process, this book is really interesting. I really like the main character. I like the part of the story that he figures out. I love that he’s a writer. But he’s just your average 15-year-old. I am curious to see how he really fits within this flawed system. It is a problem for me in this whole series that I can’t figure out who has history within the series and who is done what before. And maybe there’s a purpose for that. Maybe we’ll figure that out in the few books from now. And that history doesn’t seem to matter within this book it stands alone quite well, a short story of a boy trying to find his father.

So I guess, this book makes me even more curious to see what’s coming up.

Thank you, Rebecca J. Campbell, for letting me read your wonderful book.

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The Nature of DenialThe Nature of Denial by Madelyn March

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Disclaimer: I was given this ebook for an honest review.

Oh. My. Goodness! For me, this was an amazing book! To some, those who have never experienced mental illness in their birth families or within themselves, it might seem extreme. But if you have been blessed not to have depression or bipolar issues in your personal life if you were lucky enough to never have had post-partum depression, please read this book. Madelyn March, the author, climbs in deep and dirty to let the reader experience the confusion of being a child in an unhealthy family, and dives deeper as that grown child now has a child of her own. If Ms. March hasn’t experienced all this herself, she has done an enormous amount of research, speaking with those who have been through it.

This was a longer than the usual ebook, 250 pages. I loved the length as it gave me a chance to get to know all the characters. They were all well developed. The main character, Anna, brings you through her life to the moment of her breakdown and her struggles to come back to life. Other characters get their chance to show their own points of view which helps the reads see how these things happen in real life.

But this book doesn’t get bogged down in peoples’ heads. Life continues happening. Beauty still exists. Nature refuses to be upstaged by the minds of humans. I loved that aspect of this book. I got to travel to Michigan, hike in the woods, see the great lake, Superior. Never been there. Not sure I could handle the cold. But traveling by book never makes my fibromyalgia flare up. 🙂

Now that I know all these characters so deeply, I hate to let this group go. Though it was a nice ending with all threads tied up and hope for the future established, I want more. I want to see what happens next. I think that is a sign of a great book. And for those who might want to try it, it is free on Kindle Unlimited, only $2.99 for Kindle (I think it is well worth that) and there is a giveaway going right now on GoodReads. Oh, and the title is perfect! Try it!

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Constricted (Flawed #1.1)Constricted by Becca J. Campbell

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Disclosure: I was given this ARC for an honest review.

And that is where this gets weird. If I hadn’t volunteered to read this, I wouldn’t have finished reading or given the book two and a half to three stars. But that is my own fault. I can’t remember much about this character from the other books in the series. You would think I would remember more as he has the name of my son. But… I never could recall this character’s back story.

On the other hand, the writing was great for an ARC. I can’t say I found any mistakes. That says a lot. So many e-books go out without editing, at least that is how they feel. What also brings this story up in my rating is that I did enjoy getting to know Logan in this book. He is a flawed, real person, who tries to do his best. Who couldn’t like that?

It doesn’t fit my goal of reading books of strong fem written by strong fem authors, but the other parts of this series do fit right in, so getting to know one of the non-stars helps. I think I may have to go back and reread the series to put it all into perspective.

Sorry, Becca J. Campbell. it’s on me. You wrote quite well. I have a memory like a sieve lately. I’m sure if I remembered I would be giving it five stars. Gulp. Sorry.

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The Life you Leave BehindThe Life you Leave Behind by Coedee Shaner Burba

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Disclaimer: I picked up this book through Bookkus.com free for review. I just learned about Bookkus and am still finding my way around, but there seems to be quite a few authors willing to let their books go out there for review.

Given the above, I read bearing the imminent review in mind. I found this a very hard book to read. There is a lot of angst. The main character spends her time mooning over a married man while whipping herself with her Catholic guilt, she seems to sing “I’m just a girl who can’t say no…” As a reader, it is plain that she is walking into trouble. Even so, we are brought along on this angsty ride. I read to escape depression. This book drew me into darkness. As often as I thought, I should just move on to another book, I kept reading. It was like the train-wreck you can’t keep your eyes off of. There were redeeming qualities to the main character that kept me reading. I wasn’t sure how it would end. It didn’t seem like there could be a good ending. Yet I stayed with it.

Now that I am finished reading the book, and trying not to give away spoilers, I can say I was taught something. Maybe that was something the author was trying to teach through this story? I was shown my own judgemental feeling toward Faye. And I learned her strength of character she learned along the way through making her own mistakes of love. If you can deal with the angst of a YA romance there might be something here for you, too. Thank you for letting me read your book, Coedee Shaner Burba.

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