Category: Feminism



I want to thank Linda G. Hill for her inspiration! Today’s prompt is Eco.

The prompt sent me to the internet. I found


The definition goes on and on. Check it out here.  As I studied that I realized that I was upset. Why, if we want people to embrace feminism do make everything so hard to read for the normal person? I remember when I first started reading about feminism I could find nothing simple to read or understand. Sure I understand the word, but if you want ALL humans to get it and the average person has a reading level of 7th or 8th grade, why make your assertions college level. Good, you made it to college but we need to boil it down so that a person who is reading casually might not have to look up every other word to make sure they know what is being said.

I think it was Feminine Mystique that I tried to read when I was pre-marriage, pre-kids that wore me out.  I came from a traditional family so all I could see what how snooty these women were and the only way that information would get to the common person it needed to be watered down.

Look. Here’s what I know now. As a stay-at-home mom, I thought I was saving money on a lot of levels. I figured that I birthed them I ought to care for them. And child-care was/is more expensive than any job could pay me. So I followed my heart. Now at retirement, I make less than half the SSI than my ex-husband. How was/is that fair? If you are a stay-at-home mom right now make sure you stuff away money for your retirement. Have your own bank account. Don’t touch the money even if you have a family emergency.

Honestly, I don’t know how I would have done any differently in my life. I love my children and loved raising them to be super adults. And what should I have done when I became a single mom, let my kids starve? Don’t take them to the doctors? Don’t make sure they have a roof over their heads? I didn’t drain the system. But the system drained me!  Take that EcoFeminism!



AffinityAffinity by Sarah Waters

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I didn’t actually read the book but rather listened to the Audible version of the book. Juanita McMahon (Narrator) added her talents to the story so well-written by Sarah Waters. Both the story and the actor made this a wonderful experience.

What can I say that won’t spoil the adventure of the moment by moment read? I can’t seem to come up with anything! I went to look at the blurb and I think even that spoils it. Just know that the main character draws you in and you get curious to see what happens next. Her questions become the reader’s questions and you can only hope for the best and dread anything less.

I wish the ending would have been with the main character stronger from her experiences and then a book two for us to follow her travels. I don’t think that is a spoiler as that is me rewriting the ending. Come back to my review when you finish to tell me if you agree or not.

If you get the chance to read or listen to this book I think you will enjoy it,

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We Should All Be FeministsWe Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Look, I think of myself as a feminist. But I have read books about feminism that were the most BORING books ever written! This is not one of those! BUT the title kept me from reading it. Not because it is a bad title, but because it looked like it would be boring like those others.

It was far from long and boring. If you are lucky enough to get to have the audio version read by the author there is an extra treat.

Since I didn’t read the book along with listening I can only give my impression of what I think the tree-book is like. I think it is short essays on different aspects of the feminine daily life, especially the world Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie lives in. Her voice and accent make this a delight to hear. The stories/essays are enlighting to intellect and soul.

This is a short read. I read it in an hour before going to bed. So don’t look at it with fear like I did. It’s good and fast!

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You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)You’re Never Weird on the Internet by Felicia Day

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I have always admired Felicia Day. It was great to see a smart female actress playing smart female characters on the shows I’ve seen her on.

This book gave me insight to the person and her history. It was fun to know that we shared a similar history. No, I’m old enough to be her mother. But my children shared her history and I through them. We learned the computer from way back with CompuServe, Prodigy (where I met my husband) and various video games and bulletin boards. Her ultimate game was WoW whereas my kids got into EQ. It was fun reading about how it was physically meeting the friends she made online. That experience the kids and I shared. But it was fun to watch the computer evolving with the generation who came of age at the same time.

My children were homeschooled, too. It was interesting to see her thoughts on it. I find that we who were schooled who wasted so many years with more time dedicated to kids with bad behaviors or teachers who bored us to sleep and were still quite socially shy and experienced depression tried to save our children of that. Instead, they blame their very anxiety on not having to school. They don’t realize the opportunity they had without all the wasted time. Felicia became a professional violinist. And all these skills she acquired that makes her unique are a direct result from not being squeezed into a mold that schools force children into.

Anyway, I loved being able to listen to Felicia read her own story. It gave, even more, credence to autobiography. I knew I wanted to listen to her read it. But I found that there was no Text-to-Speech. That made me sad because had I not been able to afford the Audible version to whispersynch I would have had no way to enjoy this book. Still, it was delightful to listen to her voice. I wish her the very best in life. She deserves it!

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Once or twice a week in a normal week, my pals from Reno and I get on Google Hangout and chat. It is a way we can see each other and just enjoy our time together, even if it isn’t in person.

Thanks to my son and daughter I was able to see my pals this past week. One of those pals came to see me at my daughter’s and sometimes took me places. Even took me to the next city to see our other pal. We were too busy visiting and knitting to take a picture so I substitute this. The other pictures were of women around tables. We weren’t around tables. We were on the sofa (I like sitting on the floor.) And I believe there should be more guys who knit, feminist that I am.

guys knitting circle

Even so, knitting with my pals while visiting was the best of fun, I think for all three of us!



Yep, still behind, but still Plugging away. Check out the #AtoZChallenge to learn more.

#AtoZChallenge– B

Bad Guy, Bullie, Bastard. No, not a political statement. Could be, but…

Coming up to yesterday, I looked forward to the Walking Dead season finale. Hubby stated the obvious wish, “Can’t wait to see the end of Negan!”

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From the first time I saw him on the show I’ve yelled, “Cut his ‘L’ vad wire!” Fans of Grey’s Anatomy will understand. What I just learned is: LVAD stands for Left Ventricular Assistance Device. Thank you, Google!

But I knew Negan would not be dead at the end of this show. Negan still hasn’t told us his story. How did he become so bad? How did he start his band of Negans? When in the face of such a bullie, how can the average person live positively and not become the same kind of bad? The writer in me knows that is necessary. AND who wants to lose Jeffrey Dean Morgan?

The best stories are those where we get to know characters deeply, even the bad guys.

Still, I cried at the Sasha Williams part. Sonequa Martin was amazing!!!! I will miss her.

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She is such a beauty and quite the actress!

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And she is one of the Badass Bitches of TWD!

The other two in this picture are Maggie Greene (Lauren Cohan) on the right and Michonne (Danai Gurira) in the middle. There are other strong fems in this show but these may be my favs.

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Sasha Badass Bitch to the end!!!!

Thank goodness for the Talking Dead that helps me heal after gruesome scenes.

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That’s Chris Hardwick. Love him @Nerdist and his mother @NerdistMom!

In case you didn’t notice, this was part of the A to Z Challenge 


Please come and join the fun!

A Tapestry of TearsA Tapestry of Tears by Gita V. Reddy

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I received this book free of charge from the author.

Well, this was a treasure. You all know I don’t like short stories. I like getting to know characters deeply. That is why I read so many series. But Gita V. Reddy has pulled off keeping the story short while not leaving the reader empty.

If there was a theme running through these stories it would be “Love”. Though the stories are about Indian families/couples the American reader isn’t lost in cultural differences. The stray non-English word helps in keeping the story authentic but those aren’t over done.

The female dilemmas that plague many countries are merely spoken of in fact as part of the story and not the end goal. That made the stories more interesting.

I found re-reading the last couple stories from other books a little boring but if it were the first time for a reader to see them they might find these interesting.

Well-done, Gita! I do recommend that everyone read this book. It can make you see some of your own flaws to work on in love. It isn’t just for Indian women. It is for everyone!

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I Am Nujood, Age 10 and DivorcedI Am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced by Nujood Ali

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Thank you, Yvensong, for suggesting this read.

I was able to pick up the Overdrive and Kindle versions from the e-library. I loved the narrator: Meera Simhan. She did a great job reading for what was supposed to be a 10-year-old.

This is a great book to open the discussion of how girls and women are treated worldwide. When we look at what this poor girl and other like her have gone through, we, here in America, think that could never happen. But we have not gone far enough here. There is so much more work to show that equality is what is needed for a better world for everyone.

Nujood Ali has written a book that is short and sweet. I do believe that it could be read by all ages, and should be read by males so they can move to better understanding.

What I loved about reading along on the Kindle as the Overdrive narrator read to me were the foreign words that were hyperlinked to definitions. Even so, there weren’t so many that one couldn’t guess by context as to what they meant. I suggest everyone read this treasure.

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Everything Belongs to UsEverything Belongs to Us by Yoojin Grace Wuertz

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

NetGalley gave me this book to read and review. Thank you.

Maybe it’s the busyness of the holidays or my usual ADD, but I found this book confusing. I must’ve read the first six chapters 5 times. Once I was understanding whose point of view I was reading, I found the story engaging enough. In fact, I wanted to know what was happening to the characters. But…

The ending was dull, the ending was cheap, and I felt like I had wasted my time. I wanted to feel that the characters had achieved at least the title of the book. But it just left me flat.

That said, taking my ADD and the holidays into consideration, maybe you will love this book. And maybe I need to read it again someday.

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Temple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the WorldTemple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the World by Sy Montgomery

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I was lucky enough to pick this up from my local library system through Overdrive. My friend, Cheryl, wrote an intriguing review that had me searching it out.…

I had hoped to read while listening but the ebook but it didn’t come to me in time. That was okay. It provided my background entertainment while I worked on the charity hats and dolls. The reader, Meredith Mitchell, kept me involved in the story of Temple Grandin’s life.

I have read other books about and by Ms. Grandin. Though this book is for young people, I found it more thorough than the others in covering the aspects of autism, living with it and knowing someone who has it. The author was able to bring this disorder to the understanding that a young person would need.

Something that I felt when reading this book and others about autism is that I think there are levels of this that many of us have. The sensitivities Temple had to scratchy clothing or loud noises or too many people or strong light I can relate to. The inability to connect to others, especially in a crowded room, I can understand, too. Knowing that Ms. Grandin found ways to make her disability work for her in her life gives us all inspiration to see how we can overcome our own problems.

Though this is for children, it is neither a short book nor pablum for babies. I felt there was a lot of depth to the stories told and much to learn for all of us. Please, seek it out and see how you like it.

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