Tag Archive: Gita V. Reddy



Hop and Chomp: A Caterpillar Story: Children's Books - Picture Books for Kids - Story Books for Children - Beginner Book for Children - Age 3-7Hop and Chomp: A Caterpillar Story: Children’s Books – Picture Books for Kids – Story Books for Children – Beginner Book for Children – Age 3-7 by Gita V. Reddy

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

We live in the desert outback of Oregon. When you picture Oregon, you probably see green trees and oceans. This is mostly sagebrush and sky. I love it. There is room to breathe and did I mention sky? Many of us don’t have grassy lawns, between critters and the amount of water it would take to keep it green, it seems silly to attempt. So instead my family and I have dedicated to saving bees and inviting hummingbirds into our yard. I think because of the heavy snows of the winter we have a lot more vegetation than usual. More butterflies. And just yesterday I saw a Mourning Cloak. I realized I hadn’t seen one of those for decades.

And then this little sweet book comes into my life. How adorable the grasshopper and caterpillar are! I love how the author explains why the caterpillar needs to eat so much and about the pupa stage. The pages are colorful with butterfly backgrounds and the Rangoli designs on each page above the main characters. Those are inspiring me to try my hand at drawing them.

This book is great for the early reader but great fun for a read aloud and learning about everything from caterpillars to India and lots of art to play with. All while learning to read. I would have had a ball reading this with my kids back in the day.

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Which is p and Which is q?Which is p and Which is q? by Gita V. Reddy

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is a cute little book for the early reader. The illustrations are fun. The story as imaginative as I expect of Gita V. Reddy.

I actually read this a few days ago and am just now getting around to reviewing but the experience stays clear for me. Mostly because some of my offspring and I are dyslexic. This would have been helpful for all of us as early readers.

Ms. Reddy sent me an email a bit ago offering the read for honest review. I was more than willing as I have loved most of what she has presented to me to read. This was just as fun as the rest. As usual, there is a story, with morals and fun adventures.

As it was for the children, the book was fine. I just wish there were more hints or ideas for parents and teachers. Gita does say that one needs more practice with many letters like M and W. But L and 7 come to mind for me, lower case U and lower case N, lower case Q and lowercase G, lower case B and lower case D, 3 and E. I’m sure there are others that get confused. In fact, most letters can be switched backward or upside down. These were all so confusing to me as a kid and I had to watch my boys go through the same confusion.

Nowadays, while studying German, I am finding my old nemesis ‘I before E…’ coming back at me because in German it is the other way around. So dyslexia still plays havoc in my life. But this book is a start for the new generation of readers to play with.

As for the story and pictures, I love the one where the grandfather is emptying the box of wooden letters on the floor for Minki to play with. Having tactile experiences with the letters is so important for children who are learning about the alphabet.

Great job, Gita. I hope this will spare many children and the parents the confusion of letters that won’t stay in the right directions.

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A Tapestry of TearsA Tapestry of Tears by Gita V. Reddy

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I received this book free of charge from the author.

Well, this was a treasure. You all know I don’t like short stories. I like getting to know characters deeply. That is why I read so many series. But Gita V. Reddy has pulled off keeping the story short while not leaving the reader empty.

If there was a theme running through these stories it would be “Love”. Though the stories are about Indian families/couples the American reader isn’t lost in cultural differences. The stray non-English word helps in keeping the story authentic but those aren’t over done.

The female dilemmas that plague many countries are merely spoken of in fact as part of the story and not the end goal. That made the stories more interesting.

I found re-reading the last couple stories from other books a little boring but if it were the first time for a reader to see them they might find these interesting.

Well-done, Gita! I do recommend that everyone read this book. It can make you see some of your own flaws to work on in love. It isn’t just for Indian women. It is for everyone!

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The Empress' New GownsThe Empress’ New Gowns by Gita V. Reddy

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Oops! I thought I actually wrote a review on this book as I ACTUALLY DID write a review already. But there was a computer glitch and the computer shut down. Then, well, life happened and I forgot. Luckily a friend “liked’ the review so I came back to the page and saw what I wrote wasn’t there. Sorry.

Let’s see if I can remember the gist of it. First of all, I do a lot of reviews for Gita V. Reddy. I like her work and when I saw this one I picked it up. I think I actually paid for this one but it was cheap and an author does deserve compensation for their work. I just am on such a limited SS budget that I rarely can buy a book. My small amount won’t keep a roof over her head, but I hope my reviews help lead people to try out her books for their edification and entertainment.

As for edification… this book was a cautionary tale to the pride that can be in each of us. The original tale of the Emperor’s New Clothes is the first part of the story. But the next part should be read by preteens, teens, and new adults. Pride can be a good thing, but if we keep it in check we retain our humanity. Gita was clever telling the female version of the original story. I enjoyed it.

Most readers will find this story fun. For me, the formatting stopped the full enjoyment. Since I do most of my reading at night and always using the black background with white font, I found I couldn’t see the words. I had to change my background to a lighter color but then found it too bright. Luckily, I always use Text-to-Speech and that worked fine. But had this been a longer story I think I would have given up. I have to read while listening as my brain needs to be fully engaged to get into a story. But for most people, this formatting issue won’t cause them a bit of a problem and they well enjoy this story fully.

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Daksha the Medicine GirlDaksha the Medicine Girl by Gita V. Reddy

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Disclaimer: I was given this book by the author for an honest review.

Sorry it took so long for me to write this review. See my review for Soul Slam to find out why (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show…).

I read this book in one evening quite a while ago. I remember enjoying it a lot. I loved learning about the main character, Daksha and her life. When you live in a society that is busy with it’s own goals of education and modern medicine, it is easy to forget that others have been living with herbal medicines and more holistic ways of living than we are used to. And they have survived centuries like that. So when we read about a young girl who apprentices for the local medicine man and finds this is her passion of life, it may seem a bit off. But we grow to love and understand her and her way of life.

The part I didn’t like was how the story was over before it had a chance to follow her next steps. I wanted to know more about her learning to read and getting that kind of education and how she might have taught others how to integrate her type of medicine with others we might have grown up with. Just a thought. I almost think this could be a series. I loved that it was centered around a girl. I just want more.

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King Neptune's DeliteKing Neptune’s Delite by Gita V. Reddy

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Have you ever noticed how the most popular children’s books have children who have no parents? Hopefully, that is because parents keep children safe. But without that safety what kind of trouble could children get into on their own? King Neptune’s Delite is my proof in point. Orphaned children raised by the community were still orphaned children. And when it came to adventure, they chose adventure over the older sister’s cautions.

I would hope. Parents would read this book with their children. There are so many educational opportunities in this book that parents and teachers could implement. And maybe mature children who already have a good sense of caution could read it and not get caught up in the adventure they might have if they followed the younger siblings leanings. But should the adventurous child read this book it does become a cautionary tale. I suppose much worse could happen no no no no no no do need to do that than happens to the children of the story, but it was pretty bad as it was.

Thank you, Gita V. Reddy, for letting me read this book. It was quite the thriller from beginning to end. I found myself caught up in the story to the point of forgetting to eat or go to sleep. I just wanted to see that the kids would be okay, and if so how?

Gita is quite the storyteller! Her stories take place in her country, in India. So it gives us an education of culture and histories other than our own. I like that her stories lead us to see what we have in common with others. Example: boys who went to go fight the pirates. In this day and age, since Disney has given us Pirates of the Caribbean, even we adults might like to go on that kind of adventure. No wonder a child would!

I worked very hard not giving spoilers in this review. So instead, I say read this book; it’s a lot of fun! And grab a kid to read it to, while you’re at it! Wait, the didn’t sound quite right. But you know what I mean, I hope. 😉

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Super-Duper MontySuper-Duper Monty by Gita V. Reddy

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Did you ever have that niggling feeling that you had forgotten something? I kept forgetting that I had read this book recently and hadn’t written a review. If I hadn’t been given the book for that very reason, I wouldn’t have felt so badly when I did remember. Sorry it took me so long, Gita.

AND my memory of the book was gone. Part of it is my fibro fog is in full flare. Though I could remember that the book was cute, I know that Ms. Reddy tries to get a few lessons in there for the reader. I wanted to make sure I got it so I went back and read it again. It only took a few minutes. It was worth the re-read. Which proved to me that a child will want to return to this book often.

First, the illustrations are absolutely adorable! Abira Das (Illustrator) did a fantastic job! Second, the lessons were there. Here is a frog who is too happy-go-lucky for his own good. A lesson I tried to teach my own children was that if they wanted to wander beyond our yard they needed to have a sibling or two with them for the safety in numbers. So this educational moment would start a lot of conversations between parents and children. Or even students and teachers.

Then one could study amphibians, frogs in particular. Heck, one could even adopt a pet frog for a while learn about their growth, food, and other needs. And then make sure the children understand how important the proper environment and care is for any animal.

Last, it is a great early reader, one a parent could read aloud but the child could grow to read it independently all the while enjoying the fun pictures.

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Theft at the Fair and Other Stories (It's a Mystery)Theft at the Fair and Other Stories by Gita V. Reddy

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Disclosure: I was given this book for an honest review.

Gita V. Reddy, the author, lives in India. Her books take place in India. So, I suggest that this presents an educational opportunity for parents and teachers. Pull out the encyclopedias, books about India, and/or make sure Google is available. Though Gita takes the time to explain terms or words within the story that are regional, it would stop the flow of the story to explain everything India. And this set of stories keeps you reading, even as an adult.

The mysteries are right up front. I love that they help the reader to learn to use their powers of observation. That was the only super-power I would allow my children to use. (Otherwise, with cape flowing they would have jumped from second story windows. So no capes or pretending other powers.)

Since I should have written this yesterday, I can’t remember exactly, but I think each of the stories was about some kind of theft. (Well, duh! it is there in the title of the book! **wink, wink**) I did wonder if there was a higher incidence in India than America. But realized that it could be localized here, also. I live in a small town (population approximately one thousand) and I assume we have as much crime here, per capita as L.A. usually drug related. So India is probably comparable. AND I prefer a mystery that has to do with theft over kidnapping or murder. And in this case, it is the smart children that figure it out. Hopefully, that comes with the conversation that kids who see something should say something to parents, teachers, authorities, etc. So this book is valuable for all that the reader puts into it.

The author mentions money statements. Another Google shows us what that means and how it translates to American money. But more than anything else, these stories are fun and show us how much we have in common and teach us about other people, respecting others and their properties. And did I mention, these stories are fun?

I highly recommend this book to everyone, especially parents and teachers to facilitate a great learning experience.

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Cinderella's EscapeCinderella’s Escape by Gita V. Reddy

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Disclaimer: This ebook was given to me for an honest review.

I wanted to give this book five stars. The idea is superb! Rewriting Cinderella, giving her empowerment is right up my alley. Showing us that the strength we need is within us, that we don’t need to look to someone else to be our savior or fairy godmother is a very important lesson for us all.

And it came across; that idea. BUT. This story needs a better editing job. Besides grammatical mistakes and words that were left out or shortened, there were plotholes that stopped the enjoyment of the story. That is saying a lot, for me. I tend to get lost in a story and don’t notice those things. It is why I still haven’t put my stories out for others to read. AND English is my first language, I have no excuses. I know that English isn’t Gita’s first language yet the past books I have read of hers were amazingly well written.

And those are the mechanical problems. The overall story is hard for me to enjoy. If you like crime tales, this might be good for you. Knowing that you can be taken, kidnapped after an accident with no way out is hard enough for adults to read. I can’t imagine this story being good for children. As a girl, it would have increased my fears, even if the story shows how the main character gain her own smarts and courage to actually get out. The ending didn’t quite satisfy me either. You would think that the girl would understand not to run where she did just from all the reading she had done. And once again it was an accident that ended up saving her. I would have loved if she were able to save herself.

The story that followed about a boy that meets an actual fairy godmother was unique, also. I loved the points it made. But once again, a few plotholes and errors made it difficult to stay in the story. Still, knowing the professional person that Gita V. Reddy is, I see these as being special gems for everyone to read soon. I look forward to reading lots more by this author!

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The Ant Thief (Bed Time Tales, #2)The Ant Thief by Gita V. Reddy

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Disclaimer: I was given this book by the author for an honest review.

This story reminds me of the Grasshopper and the Ant of Aesop Fables fame. But in this case, the lazy one is the ant (no grasshoppers in this story). And the main character is a girl. Yes, girls can be lazy, too! 😉

The artwork is adorable and the story flows quite nicely. I love that the ant has so many expressions!

As a bedtime story, parents and children could discuss laziness, shame, the values of telling the truth, how you can make mistakes and make reparations. And most of all about unconditional love.

As the child learns to love this book it will make a great addition to the young reader’s shelf as well. Or Kindle shelf for the children. It reads nicely on the Kindle so makes a good to-go story.

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